Lorena A. Barba group


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Student guest blog post: the Wagner effect

The starting vortex at the trailing edge, as visualized by Prandtl in 1934 using a water channel and aluminum particles.

The fourth and final student guest post explains the Wagner effect, and its role in animal flight. We hope you enjoy the series of posts from GW students of animal locomotion! The previous guest posts are: Pterosaur quad launch Pterosaur weight estimation Pterosaur wings and flight capabilities This post completes the series, which was inspired... Continue »

Student guest blog post: pterosaur wings and flight capabilities

This is the third guest blog post authored by students of the course on animal flight for engineers at GW. The series looks into several long-standing debates about the flight of pterosaurs. The previous guest post addressed the problematic issue of estimating the weight of extinct animals like the pterosaurs, which have no living relatives.... Continue »

Student guest blog post: pterosaur weight estimation

The second in a series of blog posts by the students of "Bio-aerial Locomotion" at GW, and part of a collaborative and interactive study of some controversial issues about giant pterosaurs' ability to fly. The first student guest blog post (by Akash Druv and Alex Golding) addresses the quadrupedal-launch thesis of Prof. Michael Habib (and... Continue »

Student guest blog post: pterosaur quad launch

Illustration of the pterosaur quadrupedal launch. Appeared in Popular Science, credited to Kevin Hand (3 March 2009).

This is the first of a series of blog posts from students' course work for the "Bio-aerial Locomotion" class at GW's Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Department. The students explore several controversial topics about a giant pterosaur's ability to fly. Some background On Sept. 22, 2013, Prof. Michael Habib (who was a guest speaker in our... Continue »